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Recycled Roofing Materials: It Really Is Easy Being Green!

Each year, nine to eleven million tons of asphalt roofing waste are sent to landfills.  Disposal fees amount to over $400,000,000.  In spite of this — believe it or not — roofing projects can be environmentally friendly.  In recent years, efforts have been made to devise ways to reuse and repurpose the materials that are used by roofing contractors.

Asphalt shingles can be ground up, heated, and melted down in order to extract different components and repurpose them.  The new material is used on roads, pavement, sidewalks, bridges, ramps, fuel oil, and pothole repair.  The extracted waste is used for cold-patch or hot-patch additives.  Asphalt shingles from one normal-sized roof can generate up to 200 feet of a two-lane highway.

Wood shingles can be re-milled, chipped, or ground up to be used in boiler fuel, flooring, mulch, particle board, and animal bedding.  Concrete shingles can be crushed into stone and used for a variety of purposes.

Metal roofing can be heated, melted down, and combined with other metals to be reprocessed.  The resulting substance is used for new roofing material, street signs, and food and beverage cans.

Old shingles that are in good shape may be donated to charities such as the Habitat for Humanity ReStores or Reuse People, a non-profit that sends the materials to low-income individuals, families, and businesses in Mexico.  Freecycle, craigslist, and Salvo are other avenues through which functional shingles can be picked up and taken away for reuse.

Conscientious roofers, such as those at Big Fish Roofing Company, are doing their part to green it up by using earth-friendly materials and by recycling materials after cleanups.  Big Fish Roofing Company recycles 80% of its waste materials.   It sends some of its recyclable materials to Coastal Recycling Services in Jacksonville.  The Big Fish Team is committed to finding new ways to reduce, reuse, and recycle.  Won’t you join them?

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